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matcha milk pudding

Easy Matcha Milk Pudding

Easy Matcha Milk Pudding
 
Matcha Milk Pudding is easy to make, and tastes amazing! Sifting matcha is an important step that you don't want to skip, otherwise you have clumps in the milk. Also, straining the matcha milk is important to make the pudding smooth. The read bean paste is optional. We use whole milk, because we like the rich, creamy milk, but you can use milk with less fat or almond milk, soy milk...
Ingredients
  • For 3-4 servings
  • 1 packet (7g) gelatin
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 4-5 Tablespoons sugar
  • 1½ Tablespoons matcha powder
Instructions
  1. In a small cup, put 1 TBSP water and sprinkle the gelatin to soften
  2. Heat the milk in a small pan (do not boil)
  3. In a small container, put the sugar. Sift the matcha powder using a tea strainer onto the sugar and gently mix with a spoon
  4. Add the sugar, matcha and gelatin to the milk and stir well
  5. Strain the matcha milk to a bowl and let cool
  6. When the matcha milk is room temperature, stir again and pour it into glass cups
  7. Place the cups in a refrigerator for about 2-3 hours until it has set.
  8. Serve with whipped cream on top
 

Roast your own hojicha

Roast Your Own Hojicha

If you have expired sencha in your pantry and are wondering what to do…just roast it! Put the old sencha in a clean pan (no oil!) and roast it over moderately high heat. Constantly move the tea with a wooden spoon and shake the pan in order not to burn the tea. When the smaller pieces of the tea turn dark brown, remove from heat. The freshly roasted hojicha has a bright aroma with a hint of sencha flavor, and leaves a nice smell in the kitchen!

sencha with birds

How to Brew Sencha

Sencha, Japanese classic green tea, is a simple yet delicate tea. If infused with boiling hot water, the tea leaves will burn and turn the tea slightly bitter.
To avoid this, simply pour the hot water into a cup, then infuse with the tea so that the temperature of the water cools a bit to ensure that the tea will not be damaged.
Enjoy a nice cup of sencha!

Jugetsudo Organic Sencha

 

 

momo sencha cold brew

Cold Brew Momo (Peach) Sencha

To cold brew momo sencha, pour 1 cup (250cc) cold water to 2 gram momo sencha and wait 20 minutes.

The smooth, refreshing taste of the sencha compliments the sweet undertone of peaches along with a tiny hint of mint.

Take some time to sit down with a cup of Jugetsudo momo senchato celebrate summer!

Momo Sencha

 

Tea Fest PDX 2019 is July 20th

Tea Fest PDX is July 20th!

We are looking forward to meeting with all the tea lovers again!

We will sample all the flavored teas: Yuzu Sencha, Sakura Sencha (cherry blossom) and Momo Sencha (peach).

Come to our booth #30 and say hi!

 

Tea Fest PDX

July 20th, 9:30 am-6:00 pm

World Forestry Center

4033 SW Canyon Rd

Portland, OR 97221

 

cold brew organic sencha classic green tea

Time for Cold Brew Tea

Cold brew tea is easy to make and tastes amazing! Hot water tends to bring out the tannic, bitter flavor in tea, but with cold water, the tea will be mellow; smooth and with lots of delicate umami!
To make cold brew tea, put one teaspoon of loose leaf tea (or one teabag) in one cup of cold water. Steep for half an hour.
Try it with Jugetsudo flavored sencha–yuzu, sakura (cherry blossom) and momo (peach). The flavors will freshly stand out. You will be pleasantly surprised!

Zen a Tokyo

Zen a Tokyo is Back!

Jugetsudo green tea assortment, Zen a Tokyo is back on our selection by popular demand!
This three tea assortment includes:
Loose Leaf Mecha (bud tea)
Loose Leaf Sakura Sencha (green tea with cherry blossom petals)
Loose Leaf Yuzu Sencha (green tea with yuzu citrus)
Perfect for a gift

Zen a Tokyo

matcha latte at moonstruck chocolate cafe

Matcha Latte at Moonstruck!

Jugetsudo Matcha is now available at Moonstruck Chocolate Cafes!
Available in plain or with lychee flavoring.
Jugetsudo’s matcha is incorporated in this ingenious and delicious recipe.
Stop by for a taste!
Downtown — 6th & Alder Café
Beaverton — Town Square Café
St. John’s — Chocolate Factory & Store
Northwest — NW 23rd Ave Café
Moonstruck Chocolate

matcha biscotti

Healthy Matcha Biscotti

Healthy Matcha Biscotti
 
This easy to make biscotti is healthy because of the matcha, green tea powder that is rich in vitamins and antioxidant. And the okara makes it even healthier. Okara is soybean meal, a byproduct of the making of tofu. Okara is basically dregs from making soy milk. It is rich in fiber and protein and low in fat. Okara is not usually available at regular markets—but we are lucky in Portland, Oregon. A tofu manufacturer, Ota Tofu in east downtown, has it most of the time. Okara is not their products’ list so you have to ask for it. The price is very low. They sometimes just give it away with no charge. Please buy something else and then ask for okara! You can find dried, powdered okara on Amazon.com. Use 20g of okara powder and increase the amount of the milk to combine all the ingredients.
Ingredients
  • for 10-14 biscotti
  • 3½ oz Fresh okara
  • ½ cup Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Baking powder
  • 1½ tablespoons Sugar
  • 1½ tablespoons Matcha
  • 2 Tablespoons Chocolate chips
  • 1½ Tablespoons Vegetable oil
  • 2½ Tablespoons milk (or soymilk)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 360F.
  2. In a bowl, combine okara, flour, baking powder, sugar, matcha and chocolate chips.
  3. Add the vegetable oil and mix, using your fingers.
  4. Add the milk small amount at the time and make it a ½ inch high loaf. Place it on a baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes in the oven. Lower the oven temperature to 320F.
  5. Take out the biscotti from the oven. When it is cool enough to touch, cut the mound into ½ inch thick with a serrated knife.
  6. Arrange biscotti, with a cut side down, on a clean baking sheet and bake for 10-15 minutes. Transfer to rack to cool completely.
 

genmaicha with camelia

Genmaicha–why rice in tea?

Genmaicha is green tea with roasted brown rice. It has a unique, nutty flavor–almost like popcorn.

It is very comforting and getting popular among tea lovers these days.
But why rice in tea?! Who put rice in tea first?

There are several stories, one of which is that a tea merchant in Kyoto put pieces of old, hardened mochi (rice cake) in green tea. In Japan, people decorate mochi as an offering to Shinto God to celebrate a new year. After about two weeks, when the celebration is over, the mochi gets hardened and people break it to pieces with a wooden hammer. Eating these pieces is believed to give you good luck.

One tea merchant, who wanted to make use of the tiny pieces of this mochi, roasted them and put them in green tea.

Another story was that in olden days, tea was rather luxurious and not very affordable for common people. In the northern part of Japan, rice farmers added beans or roasted rice to tea to increase its volume.

In any case, putting roasted rice in tea was a great idea!
Jugetsudo added a little bit of matcha for extra flavor and a nice green color!
Get your organic genmaicha here.